Games
[Event "New York m"] [Site "New York"] [Date "1934.??.??"] [Round "1"] [White "Horowitz, Israel Albert"] [Black "Fine, Reuben"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A98"] [PlyCount "58"] [EventDate "1934.??.??"] [EventType "match"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "USA"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2002.11.25"] 1. d4 f5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. g3 e6 4. Bg2 Be7 5. O-O O-O 6. c4 {Note that in accordance with modern technique this advance is effected after castling, thus denying the opponent the relieving sally ...Bb4+.} d6 ({The strategy of the restriced centre, The stonewall formation is also admissable} 6... d5 7. Nc3 c6) ({Playable too is} 6... Ne4) 7. Nc3 Qe8 {A regrouping, conforming to the spirit of the defence, which from the first foreshadows expansion on the kingside.} 8. Qc2 ({At the crossroads. White prepares the advance of his e-pawn, which could also be effected by} 8. Re1) ({or even indirectly by} 8. Bg5 {with a view to} -- 9. Bxf6 Bxf6 10. e4) ({Useless would be the diversion} 8. Nb5 Bd8) ({but a sound, constructive idea is} 8. b3 {for after} Qh5 9. Qc2 Nbd7 10. Ba3 {the counterthrust} e5 {is still impeded.}) 8... Nc6 9. a3 $2 ({ Excessively cautious . As} 9. e4 {would be neutralised by} e5) ({he would do well to harrass his opponent by} 9. d5 Nd8 ({or} 9... Nb4 10. Qb3) 10. Nd4) 9... e5 {Thus Black has achieved his central advance ahead of his opponent.} 10. d5 Nd8 11. b4 ({He underestimated the action preparing on the opposite wing. Better would be, now or on his next move} 11. Bg5) 11... Bd7 12. Nd2 Qh5 {The direct attack.} 13. f3 Nf7 14. e4 ({A dead point which virtually immobilises six (!) of his pieces. He should have tried} 14. Rf2 {for example} f4 15. Nf1) 14... f4 15. g4 Qh4 16. Nb3 ({Hoping not so much for action on the queenside, as for relief by blocking as far as possible the critic} 16. Nb3 { l sector after} -- 17. Qf2 Qh6 18. h4 g5 19. h5) ({But Black's strong reply maintains his advantage. Best therefore should be at once} 16. Rf2 {with 17. Nf1.}) 16... h5 17. gxh5 ({Compulsory. If} 17. h3 Ng5) 17... Qxh5 {Diagram [#] } 18. Rf2 Ng5 19. Nd2 Kf7 {Initiating a very instructive phase, in which Black's artillery exploits the h-file and thence overruns the adjacent open file.} 20. Nf1 Rh8 21. Ne2 Qh4 22. Qd2 Nh5 23. Nc3 Rh6 24. Re2 Rg6 25. Kh1 Rh8 ({Now things happen with a rush. Black's preceding move threatened 25. ... Nxf3+ now he threatens} 25... Rh8 26. -- Ng3+) 26. Rf2 {Diagram [#]} Ng3+ $1 27. Kg1 ({A tottering king. He hopes to hold out after} 27. Kg1 Nxf1 28. Kxf1 Qxh2 29. Ke2) 27... Nh3+ 28. Bxh3 Ne2+ 29. Kh1 Rg1# 0-1 [Event "AVRO"] [Site "Holland"] [Date "1938.11.06"] [Round "1"] [White "Fine, Reuben"] [Black "Botvinnik, Mikhail"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C17"] [Annotator "John Sherwood"] [PlyCount "61"] [EventDate "1938.??.??"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "14"] [EventCountry "NED"] [Source "Caissas Edition"] [SourceDate "1999.07.01"] 1. e4 {Prepared specially for this tournament. Fine was a 1.d4 player, but expanded his opening repertoire for AVRO, having just completed his revision of Modern Chess Openings.} e6 {Botvinnik always played either the French or the Sicilian, and Fine tells us he was prepared for both.} 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 {The Winawer, Botvinnik's usual choice, as it is the sharpest line. " [Botvinnik] always seeks out the most complicated positions. If a move leads to a good fight, he is for it." [Fine]} 4. e5 c5 5. dxc5 $5 (5. Bd2 { Bogolubov's move was generally preferred at the time. Fine prepared the text move to introduce an element of surprise - and perhaps to side-step his opponent's renowned preparation in the Winawer.}) 5... Ne7 ({The complications following} 5... d4 6. a3 {are in White's favour.}) ({Bogolubov - Alekhine (Bad Neuheim 1936) a game cited in in Fine's edition of MCO went} 5... Nc6 6. Nf3 f6 7. Bb5 Bxc5 8. O-O Bd7 9. Re1 fxe5 $2 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 Bxb5 12. Nxb5 { with a quick crush of the ex-champion.}) 6. Nf3 Nbc6 {Preparing his next move.} 7. Bd3 ({Fine gives} 7. Bd2 Ng6 8. Bb5 O-O $11) 7... d4 8. a3 Ba5 $1 ({White has a lasting initiative after} 8... dxc3 9. axb4 cxb2 10. Bxb2 Nxb4 11. Bc4 $1 Qxd1+ 12. Kxd1 $1 O-O 13. Ke2 $17 -- {intending} 14. Nd4) 9. b4 Nxb4 ({Not} 9... dxc3 $6 10. bxa5 Qxa5 11. O-O Qxc5 12. a4 Nxe5 13. Ba3 Nxf3+ 14. Qxf3 Qc7 15. Rfd1 $1 O-O (15... Bd7 16. Be4 Bc6 17. Qxc3 $14) 16. Bd6 Qd8 17. Qg3 $14 { followed by} -- 18. Bc4 {with a very enjoyable game for White.}) 10. axb4 Bxb4 {Diagram [#]} 11. Bb5+ $1 ({White is no better than eq ual after} 11. O-O Bxc3 12. Rb1 {e.g.} Qd5 13. Ng5 (13. Bb5+ Bd7 14. Bxd7+ Qxd7 15. Bb2 Bxb2 16. Rxb2 Nc6 $15) 13... Qxe5 14. Qf3 f6 15. Bb5+ Kf8 {when he is well advised to take the draw with} 16. c6 Qd5 17. cxb7 Bxb7 18. Nxe6+ Kf7 19. Ng5+ Kf8 20. Ne6+ { etc.}) 11... Nc6 $6 ({Botvinnik points out the much better} 11... Bd7 12. Qxd4 Bxc3+ 13. Qxc3 Bxb5 {with White's king trapped in the centre. Then} 14. Qb3 Bc6 15. O-O O-O ({or perhaps} 15... a5 {and ....a5-a4 to go with ...0-0, .... Qc7 and ...Rfd8 with good play.}) 16. Bg5 Qc7 17. Nd4 Ng6 18. Rfe1 h6 19. Bd2 Qd7 (19... Nxe5 $2 20. Bf4 Bd5 21. Bxe5 $18) 20. Bc3 Rfc8 {is somewhat better for Black. Both Fine and Botvinnik regarded the text as a losing move, but on closer examination one is inclined to agree with Kasparov that Botvinnik had a chance to develop excellent, even equalising, counterplay at move 14.}) 12. Bxc6+ bxc6 13. Ra4 $1 {Very fine, forcing the trade of Black's strong bishop and making it a simple matter to regain the pawn.} Bxc3+ 14. Bd2 {Diagram [#]} f6 $2 ({After this Botvinnik is no longer in the game. He can hold with} 14... a5 $1 15. O-O Ba6 16. Bxc3 (16. Re1 Bb5 17. Ra3 a4 $11) 16... dxc3 (16... Bxf1 $2 17. Rxd4 Qc7 18. Qxf1 $16) 17. Qxd8+ Rxd8 18. Re1 O-O 19. Rxa5 Bb5 20. Ra3 Rd5 21. Rxc3 Ra8 $11 {(Based on analysis by Botvinnik)}) 15. O-O O-O (15... fxe5 $2 16. Nxe5 O-O 17. Bxc3 dxc3 18. Qd6 $16) 16. Bxc3 dxc3 17. Qe1 a5 (17... fxe5 18. Qxc3 Rf4 19. Raa1 $1 e4 20. Qe3 Rf5 21. Nd2 $16) 18. Qxc3 Ba6 19. Rfa1 Bb5 {Diagram [#]} 20. Rd4 $1 ({Prudent restraint, for} 20. Rxa5 $2 Rxa5 21. Qxa5 (21. Rxa5 Qd1+ 22. Qe1 Qxe1+ 23. Nxe1 Re8 $11) 21... Qxa5 22. Rxa5 Re8 { dissipates White's advantage.}) 20... Qe7 21. Rd6 a4 22. Qe3 Ra7 23. Nd2 a3 ({ Kasparov points out} 23... Ra5 24. c4 Ba6 25. Ne4 $18 {e.g.} f5 26. Qd2 Qc7 27. Nf6+ gxf6 28. Rd7 Qxe5 29. Re1 $18) 24. c4 Ba4 25. exf6 Qxf6 26. Rxa3 Re8 27. h3 {Some air, just to be safe.} Raa8 28. Nf3 Qb2 29. Ne5 Qb1+ 30. Kh2 Qf5 31. Qg3 {Diagram [#]} 1-0 [Event "AVRO"] [Site "Holland"] [Date "1938.11.25"] [Round "13"] [White "Fine, Reuben"] [Black "Alekhine, Alexander"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C76"] [PlyCount "91"] [EventDate "1938.??.??"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "14"] [EventCountry "NED"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "1999.07.01"] {The following game is a good example of Fine's simple but direct technique. (WAF)} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 d6 5. O-O Bd7 ({Or} 5... b5 6. Bb3 Na5 7. d4 exd4 8. Nxd4 Bb7 9. c4 Nxc4 10. a4 c6 11. Qe2 Ne7 12. Bg5 h6 {with equality, Leonhardt,P-Schlechter,C Nuremberg 1906}) 6. c3 g6 7. d4 Bg7 {The fianchetto development is rarely seen nowadays.} 8. dxe5 (8. Be3 Nge7 9. c4 $1 (9. Re1 O-O 10. dxe5 Nxe5 11. Nxe5 Bxe5 12. Bb3 Nc6 13. Nd2 Bg7 {with an even game. Michell,R-Capablanca,J Hastings 1919}) 9... exd4 10. Nxd4 O-O 11. Nc3 Nxd4 12. Bxd4 Bxa4 13. Nxa4 Bxd4 14. Qxd4 Nc6 15. Qd2 Qf6 16. Rad1 {with a minimal advantage. Yates,F-Capablanca,J, Hastings 1929}) 8... Nxe5 ({Perhaps better is} 8... dxe5 9. Be3 Nge7 10. Bc5 {but Black's game is still not easy.} {If} O-O 11. Bxc6 {cripples Black's pawns.}) 9. Nxe5 dxe5 10. f4 $1 ({New and strong. The usual move is} 10. Be3) 10... Bxa4 ({Much later Romanovsky found an improvement here for Black} 10... Bb5 $1 11. Bxb5+ axb5 12. Qb3 Qd7 13. fxe5 Bxe5 14. Na3 c6 {but by} 15. Bf4 {White still gets good play.}) 11. Qxa4+ Qd7 ( {A temporary pawn sacrifice which is practically forced since} 11... b5 12. Qb3 {would give White chances, not only along the f-file, but also on the queen's wing (a2-a4).}) 12. Qxd7+ Kxd7 13. fxe5 Ke6 14. Bf4 ({So that the pawn cannot be taken by Black. If} 14. Bf4 Bxe5 15. Bxe5 Kxe5 16. Rxf7) 14... Rf8 (14... Ne7 {was not much better. There would follow} 15. Nd2 Nc6 16. Nf3 {and it would be difficult for Black to meet the twin threats of Nd4+ and Ng5+.}) 15. Nd2 Bxe5 16. Nb3 $1 {Threatens 17.Nc5+. It is clear that the vulnerable position of White's king is still causing trouble.} Bxf4 ({A trap. If now} 16... Bxf4 17. Nc5+ {Black wins a piece by} Kd6 18. Nxb7+ Kc6 19. Na5+ Kb5) 17. Rxf4 b6 {Diagram [#]} 18. a4 $1 (18. a4 -- {Threatening} 19. a5 $1 {to which Black could not reply} b5 {because of} 20. Nc5+) 18... Ke5 ({Up and at 'em. Euwe considers this is a serious error, but Black is already lost. If} 18... a5 {(as he suggests)} 19. Nd4+ Ke7 20. Rd1 {wins. Black cannot develop.}) 19. g3 $1 ({Black had underestimated the force of this simple little move. Apparently he had reckoned only with} 19. Raf1 {whereupon} f5 20. g4 Ne7 { would have followed. The advantage of White's actual move is that the queen's rook remains on its own file - a very important point in view of the threatened a4-a5.}) 19... Nf6 (19... g5 $1 {would have been fatal, for after} 20. Rf5+ Kxe4 21. Raf1 {the black king is in a mating net.}) ({Nor is there time for} 19... a5 {because of} 20. Nd4 $1 {after which} Nf6 {fails against} 21. Nf3+ Ke6 22. Ng5+ Ke5 ({or} 22... Ke7) 23. Raf1 {winning the f-pawn.}) 20. Nd2 Nh5 ({The knight is out of play here.} 20... Nd7 {would have been a little stronger.}) 21. Rf2 Ke6 {Black now realises that 18. ....Ke5 was an unfortunate choice.} (21... a5 {would have been met by} 22. b4) 22. a5 $1 Ra8 ( {Not} 22... b5 23. Nb3 Kd6 24. Rd1+ Kc6 25. Rdf1 f6 26. g4 {and Black's position crumbles to pieces.}) 23. Raf1 $1 Rhd8 ({Black loses a pawn after} 23... Rhf8 24. g4 Ng7 25. axb6 cxb6 26. Rf6+ Ke7 27. Nc4) 24. Nf3 Ke7 ({If} 24... f6 {then} 25. g4 Nf4 26. Nd4+ Rxd4 27. Rxf4 Rd2 28. Rxf6+) 25. axb6 cxb6 26. Ng5 $1 (26. Ng5 {Now} f6 {loses to} 27. Nxh7 Rd6 28. g4 {The loss of a pawn can no longer be avoided.}) 26... h6 {Alekhine was in terrible time straits. Three minutes left for fourteen moves.} 27. Rxf7+ Kd6 28. Nf3 g5 29. Nd4 {The rest is only a matter of endgame technique.} Re8 30. Rh7 Rh8 31. Rff7 Rxh7 32. Rxh7 Rf8 33. Rxh6+ Nf6 34. Nf3 Kc5 35. Nd2 g4 {Fifteen seconds with five moves to go.} 36. Rg6 Nd7 37. Rxg4 Ne5 38. Rg5 Kd6 39. Rf5 Rd8 40. Nf3 Nd3 {Under the wire in time to resign.} 41. Rd5+ Ke7 42. Rxd8 Kxd8 43. b3 Ke7 44. Nd2 a5 45. Kf1 b5 46. Ke2 1-0